Thursday, 18 December 2014

Harvest Mice

During my childhood in Kingsley the local Harvest Mouse population was healthy, I know this, because there was ample evidence of their presence in the form of their ball shaped nests in corn fields and around the hedges bordering corn fields. In addition to this they were easily seen in Bill Lamport's barn. The barn, which stood at Jude Farm, beyond the Straits opposite Kingsley Nurseries. In those days, and I don’t remember the year, the barn was relatively new. It stored bales of straw. Sitting quietly upon the bales, it would not be long before those tiny and, in my view, enchanting, little creatures appeared for the watcher to observe.

The Harvest Mouse, as a species, was first discovered / recorded by Gilbert White. Gilbert White, of course, wrote White's Natural History of Selborne which featured the wild life of his parish just a few miles from Kingsley. White being the vicar for Selborne for many years. Like many of his class of the day White wrote. There are many classic works written by vicars over the years but White's Natural History has sold and been published more than any other book. Indeed, I recently read that White's book has only been surpassed, in publishing terms, by the Bible. Quite an achievement.
I have numerous editions of the book in my collection and I am pretty certain the reason the book has obtained such a following is due to the fact that White's powers of observation were faultless. Well almost so, he did rather mess up with swallows, which he thought hibernated in the mud at pond sides during the winter months. Not withstanding this the rest of his work was very accurate. Clearly Selborne had a good number of harvest mice and White found them.

For the most part these little creatures live in and around corn fields, they feed upon the grain and nest amongst the stalks of corn. Like a lot of things, modern farming techniques dealt quite a blow to these mice. Combine harvesters had a huge impact upon Harvest Mouse numbers. It would, however, appear that they adapted to the challenge by building their nests in tall grass and hedgerows. I have no idea what the current population in Kingsley is like. I have a feeling that a lot less corn is grown in and around the village nowadays so who knows ?

During the time of which I write there was a well known T.V presenter and writer by the name of George Cansdale. George specialised in all things to do with animals and pets. He wrote several books of which his Book of Pets was a treasured possession of mine. Sadly long lost. Unlike many pet books this one dealt alphabetically with all sorts of animals, not just the normal domestic varieties. Of course, times were different, and catching wild animals for pets was nothing to be frowned at them. Most village boys had, at some time, caught fledgling birds, lizards, newts and tiddlers of all sorts. Keeping tadpoles was an annual event for many of us and some actually went to the extent of catching grass snakes. Not I, I hasten to add, I have never had much of a liking for snakes. So, the point being, for country children catching and keeping various species of wild life was not unusual or illegal. In George’s book he went into the detail of how to catch and care for all manner of wild things, including the Harvest Mouse. These tiny creatures, he wrote, quickly became tame and got used to being handled. This I can confirm to be the case, unlike other mouse species, these little beauties did not bite very much at all especially if the person holding them handled them with care and didn’t hurt them. Although I caught many I didn’t keep them as pets it was fun just to catch them and then let them go. I once had a black and white mouse bought from a pet shop and it spent most of its short life trying to find ways to die, so mouse keeping lost its appeal for me.

So, dear reader the next time you find yourself in a straw barn in or around Kingsley sit quietly for a few minutes, listen and be patient. These little creatures, in spite of their tiny size make quite a lot of noise so you generally hear them before you see them. The wait and the patience is well worth the trouble. Scampering about and using their, comparatively, long tails to climb they provide a delightful and captivating display. I hope they are still around Kingsley and that some of you get the chance to see them.

Wednesday, 10 December 2014

December Crimestoppers

Here we are with Christmas snapping at our heels all over again. It doesn’t seem possible; we’ve only just put away the tree from last year and finished the Easter Eggs!

As our shopping centres start filling up to bursting point with shoppers, Police are out in force to dissuade those inclined to help themselves, from committing crimes. People caught helping themselves in stores WILL be arrested and prosecuted.

There is an assumption from some thieves that stealing from shops is a victimless crime. Clearly that is not the case, and we all finish up paying increased prices to cover the cost of those who help themselves. In the current economic climate, smaller traders particularly can ill afford to have their stock stolen.

Often, shoplifting gangs will travel from outside the area to target a town, fill their bags, and then move on. Police will be at bus and rail stations targeting those that thought it might be a good idea to travel to Hampshire to steal someone else’s Christmas.

Whilst being jostled in the throng, it is easy for a pickpocket to have your purse or wallet out of your bag, or pocket. Avoid using a back pocket for your wallet, and keep your handbag zipped up at all times. If you have a zipped pocket in your jacket, that will also slow down any would-be thief.

Keep an eye on your shopping bags too. There are many distractions at this time of year, and if you have your young children with you, they too will be excited (even more excited than you!) and take more of your attention. It only takes a moment for someone to pick up one of your shopping bags and walk away with it. You may not even notice until you get home, and then wonder if you’re going mad as you were sure you’d bought…..

When loading your car in supermarket car parks, keep an eye on your trolley. Again, it only takes a moment for someone to walk by and take something from the top of your trolley whilst you are putting your handbag in the front of the car, or strapping your children into their seats. A bottle of spirits or even a joint of meat can easily disappear without you even noticing, and can be quite expensive to replace.

It wouldn’t be Christmas without mentioning drinking and driving. Of course, you can’t drive whilst unfit through drink or drugs at any time of the year and few of us would be foolish enough to do so. However, please remember that it can take some while for alcohol to leave your system so if you are driving the following day after a good party, you may still be over the limit.

If you suspect a drink driver or have information about ANY crime, please do not hesitate to give Crimestoppers a call on 0800 555 111 or log on to www.crimestoppers-uk.org where you can also give information and remain anonymous. For those tweeters amongst you, please follow me @HantsCrimestopp for regular Crimestoppers updates.

 I wish you a very Happy Christmas and a peaceful New Year.

Monday, 1 December 2014

A ferret called Eichman

Eichman was a large Polecat hob, that is to say he was a male of the species, the females are known as gills. He was about the size of a small cat and, having been well handled, was very tame as far as humans were concern. With all forms of animal life it was quite a different story. True to his species he was a ferocious predator and he didn’t much care what he attacked and killed.

Before he found himself a resident in Kingsley Eichman had resided in, what was then, Courage's Brewery. It would appear, at that time, the brewery was troubled by a serious cat problem. Much like feral farm cats the brewery population had found an acceptable habitat and settled in. It is quite possible that, in the first instance, the cats had actually been introduced to deal with a mouse or rat problem. However, and be that as it may, they did what cats do and embarked upon a highly successful breeding programme. The cat population expanded at an alarming pace. So much so that they became, at best, a pest and at worst a health hazard. It was decided the cat population had to be managed and this meant a drastic reduction of numbers. I am told the attempts to achieve this were half hearted and not very successful. I know not what methods were employed but it would appear that whatever they were was nothing short of a losing battle.

As a result of the above, and the ever increasing cat numbers, a member of staff, (I know not whom it was ), came up with the idea of introducing a ferret to tackle the problem. This, it was considered, would drastically reduce numbers and might, if they were lucky, encourage the cats to vacate the brewery buildings altogether. A presumed spin off was the likelihood that Eichman would deal with any rats or mice he may encounter whilst on cat reduction duties. This all went pretty much to plan, Eichman was adept at cat killing and on quite a grand scale. Large numbers of kittens went to meet their maker and overall the plan was hailed a success. However, all good things must come to an end and Eichman became the subject of some unwelcome attention from the cat loving element amongst the brewery staff. There were dark rumblings of action against the ferret and even darker ones of leaks to the local paper. The thought of the murderous actions of Eichman appearing upon the front page of the local rag was too much for the brewery management. Panic ensued and an order was issued banning the ferret from the establishment.

My brother Robin was working at the brewery at the time and one evening he arrived home with Eichman. As to his name, that came about as a result of the much publicised capture and abduction of Adolf Eichman from South America by Mosad, the Isreali Secret Service. Eichman, it will be remembered was a leading Nazi and had been responsible for murdering many thousands of Jewish people. He was put on trial and executed. The ferret began his cat control when, or shortly after, the real Eichman had featured all over the newspapers. His actions were laid bare for all to read of and as a result of all this and the ferret’s delight in killing things, the poor creature was given the name of Eichman.

He settled in at home and was taken for the occasional walk on a lead. Fitted with a ferret harness attached to the lead he would run along quite happily. On one occasion my brothers and I took him to the old railway line behind the copse which is located on the Kingsley side of the old line and is roughly below the Straits. Here there were rabbit holes and we wanted to try the ferret at a bit of rabbiting. Unfortunately no rabbits were found but on our return journey Eichman became very interested in a pair of white trainers that one of us was wearing. I don’t remember which one of us it was. The return journey was late and darkness had fallen, this, I suppose made the trainers rather more noticeable. The polecat was in no doubt the footwear was killable and he launched a number of strikes against the shoes as they passed his line of sight. Fearing a nasty bite to the wearer he was carried home without further incident. As far as I can recall he lived a good old ferrets life before passing on and, no doubt, dreaming of the glories of cat killing in ferret Heaven.
 

Wednesday, 26 November 2014

Fred Bone 1939-2014

Yesterday, Tuesday 25th November, Fred's passing was marked with a brief ceremony at Aldershot Crematorium followed by a funeral service in All Saints Kingsley, both led by the Rector, Rev Tony Pears. Some 70 villagers attended the 3pm church service and the subsequent wake in the Cricketers.

Dave Eustace gave the eulogy, Chris White provided poetry, Linda Stammers played the organ and the Kinge family organised beer and sandwiches.


CATS, BEER, BETTING


Wednesday, 12 November 2014

Fred Bone

The memorial service for Fred Bone will take place in All Saints, Kingsley at 3pm on Tuesday 25th November and afterwards in the Cricketers.

Monday, 10 November 2014

Cracking down on counterfeiting

You may have seen in the media a while ago that the Police and Officers from FACT (Federation of Copyright Theft) raided a house in Hampshire where counterfeit DVDs and CDs were allegedly being produced. A man was arrested following information from the community, and thousands of pounds worth of equipment and counterfeit items were seized.

The supply of fake goods is a multimillion pound industry. Sometimes, it is done by individuals trying to make a fast buck at our expense. However, organised criminal gangs also see counterfeiting as a good way to make quick money and a chance to launder money from other crimes. In this case, the cheap market stall bargain, for example, takes money from innocent shoppers to create a new profit stream to fund drugs, human trafficking and prostitution. The gangs who produce fake goods are large, well organised and international.

Trading standards in Hampshire and Isle of Wight seized some two thousand fake items last year.  Much of it has been clothing and shoes along with wallets, belts and jewellery. The range of the fakes in markets and on line is huge and includes counterfeit medicines or alcohol which can be very harmful, and fake online virus protection designed to tap into bank details.  One of the largest recent local cases involved fake golf clubs which saw the counterfeiter in Crown Court with a confiscation order of over £100,000.

Counterfeiting is a crime that we assume doesn’t affect us here in Hampshire. However that sadly isn’t true. If you are buying something at a car boot sale, or a market, or online, which really does seem too good to be true, it probably is! Please be cautious as the bargain may not prove to be the bargain you thought.

As usual, the cost of Christmas will bear heavily on many this year, and youngsters particularly often only want the top names in clothing, shoes and accessories. If you buy the cheaper counterfeit versions, in addition to buying inferior goods which won’t last, they are often made without the same safety standards we expect from the genuine article, so could prove dangerous. People trying to get a ‘good’ deal, don’t realise they are sometimes actually giving a big Christmas bonus to criminals.

Crimestoppers works with the support of the Home Office, the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA), the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT), the Bank of England, the Film Distributors Association (FDA) and clothing manufacturer Pentland to crack down on counterfeiting.

If you have information about any crime, please call Crimestoppers on 0800 555111 or log on to www.crimestoppers-uk.org . Your call is free, no one will know you called and you may earn a cash reward. If you are a Tweeter, please follow me @HantsCrimestopp for regular updates.

PC Simon Wright



Wednesday, 29 October 2014

Temporary Road Closures

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Hampshire County Council is making an order to allow highway maintenance works to be executed.

ROADS TO BE CLOSED: those parts of the following roads:
1.    Wellsworth Lane, Rowlands Castle between its junction with Bowes Hill and its termination.
2.    Wellswood Gardens, Rowlands Castle between its junction with Wellsworth Lane and its termination.
3.    Meadowlands, Rowlands Castle between its junction with Wellsworth Lane and its termination.
4.    Chapel Gardens, Lindford between its junction with Chase Road and its termination (including spur roads).
5.    Grayshott Laurels, Lindford between its junction with Lynwood Close and its junction with Headley Road.
6.    Hamilton Close, Bordon between its junction with Mill Chase Road and its termination.
7.    Glen Road, Grayshott between its junction with Avenue Road and its termination.
8.    Avenue Road, Grayshott between its junction with Glen Road and its junction with Headley Road.
9.    Wheatley Lane, Kingsley between its junction with Sickles Lane and its junction with The Street.
10.    Sickles Lane, Kingsley between its junction with Wheatley Lane and its junction with Gold Hill.
11.    Stubbs Farm Lane, Kingsley between its junction with Isington Lane and its termination.
12.    Colemore Lane, Colemore between its junction with Monkey Lane and its junction with Petersfield Road.
13.    Shell Lane, Colemore between its junction with A32 and its junction with Colemore Lane.
14.    Becksteddle Farm Road, Colemore between its junction with Petersfield Road and its termination.
15.    Newmans Lane, Froxfield between its junction with Upper Bramdean Lane and Broadway.
16.    Broadhanger Lane, Froxfield between its junction with Broadway and its junction with King Lane.
17.    Drayton Lane, East Meon between its junction with West Meon Rd and its junction with Bereleigh House Ln.
18.    Old Down Lane, East Meon between its junction with Riplington Ln and its junction with Bereleigh House Ln.
19.    Pulens Lane, Petersfield between its junction with London Road and its junction with Heath Road East.
20.    Heath Road East, Petersfield between its junction with Pulens Lane and its junction with Sussex Road.
21.    Brook Lane, Selborne between its junction with Nore Hill Common Road and its junction with Empshott Road.
22.    Standford Lane, Headley between its junction with A325 Farnham Road and its junction with Hollywater Road.
23.    Sandy Lane, Liphook between its junction with A3 and its junction with Linchmere Road.
24.    Longmoor Road, Liphook between its junction with B3004 Headley Road and its termination.

ALTERNATIVE ROUTES:
1-7, 11, 14 & 24 – None Available.
8.    Glen Road, Headley Road.
9.    The Straits, Isington Road, Church Street,The Street.
10.    Main Road, Isington Road, The Straits.
12.    Monkey Lane, Colemore Lane.
13.    Colemore Lane, Petersfield Road, A32 Gosport Road.
15.    Highcross Lane, King Lane, Broadway.
16.    King Lane, Broadway.
17.    West Meon Road, Bereleigh House Lane.
18.    Bereleigh House Road, Riplington Lane.
19.    Heath Road, B2070 Dragon Street, College Street, B2070 Rameshill, London Road.
20.    Moggs Mead, Dragon Street, College Street, Rameshill, London Road.
21.    Mill Lane, Noar Hill, Common Road.
22.    Hollywater Road, Liphook Road, A325 Petersfield Road/High Street.
23.    Woolmer Hill Road, Critchmere Hill, Hindhead Road, Shotter Mill Road, B2131.

DURATION OF ORDER: From 27th October 2014 for a period of 18  months or until completion of the works whichever is sooner.  (Notwithstanding, it is expected that each closure will be required for no longer than 3 days between 9.30 am and 4.30 pm.)  Reasonable facilities will be provided to allow access to adjacent premises while the work is being carried out.
Further information at: www.hants.gov.uk/publicnotices. Telephone inquires to: Hampshire County Council, Roads and Transport 0845 603 5633

STUART JARVIS Director, Economy, Transport & Environment The Castle, Winchester, SO23 8UD

Monday, 20 October 2014

More birds

Just a few days ago whilst shooting in mid Dorset I saw a sight which I have not seen for many years and which was, during my childhood, was a common sight in Kingsley. I am referring to a large flock of Lapwings. Lapwings, also known as Peewits or Green Plovers were a common sight all around the village. The fields right across from the old church of St. Nicolas all the way through to where the Farnham / Bordon road enters Buckthorn Oak were the range of large flocks of these birds. They were also to be seen in the meadows bordering the river from the Kingsley mill down through to Sleaford. The meadows along the river at various points, and in autumn and winter months, would sometimes flood and this provided idea habitat for Lapwings as they are wading birds. In the fields around the Sports Club and its grounds it was a common sight to see large numbers of Lapwings following tractors whilst various cultivations were taking place. In the spring the birds would make their nests in the same fields and father would occasionally bring home eggs he had found whilst driving tractor on the Old Park Farm fields. The eggs are a deepish olive green colour with heavy irregular black blotches upon them. I don’t recall having eaten one myself but I am told they are delicious, plovers eggs were always claimed to be something of a delicacy. Apart from the sight of the large flocks of the birds, their presence could be noted by the constant peewit call from which one of their names derives. The bird is notable for the way in which it protects its young. Nesting as they do in a shallow scoop on the ground, usually on stony ground, which affords a little camouflage, the chicks are hatched and they too have a colouring designed to provide a degree of concealment. If a sitting hen bird is disturbed or frightened when the chicks have hatched she puts on an elaborate pretence. In an attempt to lure the threat away she jumps into the air flapping her wings in a way to suggest that she is injured and unable to fly. This exhibition she keeps up whilst gradually luring the threat away from the site of the nest and or chicks. When she considers the threat is over she simply takes off and flies away leaving a bewildered onlooker. I suspect that those large flocks of Lapwings are very much a thing of the past as far as Kingsley is concerned as I don’t recall them being there when I was in my late teens.

However, having begun pondering the Lapwing I began considering other birds that were once a common sight, and sound, around the village and which are probably not there now in anything like the numbers they once were, if at all.

The next one I thought of was the Skylark. From Spring throughout the summer the sound of the Skylark filled the air in much of the area I have described where the Lapwings could be found. This area, as far as the larks were concerned, did not include the wetter parts of the water meadows through the river valley. Ground nesting birds, the Skylark preferred areas where arable crops were grown and on ground the was essentially dry. The haunting, warbling, somewhat fluttery song of the Skylark is, in my view, one of the great summer sounds of the countryside … or was. As is indicated in the title of Vaughan William’s Lark Ascending classical composition, the Skylark sings loudly as it rises in almost vertical flight. It climbs to great heights as it sings before fluttering back to earth to begin its routine all over again. The song is so distinct that once heard and linked to the little bird it is unlikely that one could ever forget it. There must have been dozens of pairs of Skylarks throughout the region I refer to when I was a boy. I do still occasionally hear the larks where I live now but in greatly reduced numbers and usually on corn fields upon down land. I imagine modern agricultural practices and machinery have contributed to the decline of the larks. Incidentally, it is also claimed that the Skylark will resort to a similar display of injury when its nest is threatened much as the Lapwing does.

The next bird which stimulated my memory was the Grey Partridge. When I lived at Woodfield the Grey Partridges could be heard in the fields behind the houses and across the fields on both sides of the railway line. Their sort of creaky, scratchy sound, a call rather than a song, was particularly evident during summer evenings. The Grey Partridge is the indigenous species of partridge and was fairly common in and around the fields of Kingsley in those days. Although a game bird by definition I don’t recall and special shooting parties pursuing the birds over most of the area concerned. Old Park Farm held occasional shoots as did a number of other farms in the area but, as far as I am aware, there were no formal shoots on a regular basis. The birds lived a natural life and were certainly not keepered.

As far as Kingsley was concerned Pheasant were around in smallish numbers. A few were reared and released in the woods between Kingsley and Binsted which ensured the birds could often be seen and no doubt provided an addition to the informal shoots that took place. Larger more formal shoots existed at Wyke on land owned then by the Bonham–Carters and at Oakhanger in the woods beyond the cricket pitch towards Selborne. The keeper up there was one Jock Hartly. As a child I well remember Mr. Hartly’s reputation … you didn’t mess with Jock! It was on the Bonham–Carter shoot that, as a young boy, I first went beating. How I got involved, I am not clear, but I think it was as a result of being in the scouts at East Worldham and meeting another lad who was a beater. However, it was the beginning of a life-long passion and one that I still pursue today. Indeed I have the great joy of taking two of my grandsons with me and I have no doubt my other grandchildren will follow suit as they become old enough.

Sunday, 19 October 2014

Kingsley Parish Council 23.10.14

Kingsley Parish Council will meet on Thursday, 23rd October 2014 in the Kingsley Centre at 7.30pm.

AGENDA

1. Chairman’s Opening Remarks
2. Apologies for Absence
3. Declarations of Personal/Prejudicial Interest
4. Public Question Time: Public Questions
Consideration of agenda items which will be open to public participation

5. Approval of Minutes of the Meeting held on 25th September 2014
6. Matters Arising
7. Planning Applications
Applications ongoing:
30633/024 Grooms Farm, Frith End Road, Frith End, Bordon, GU35 0QR
Ancillary building for events associated with existing hotel, together with landscaping, parking works (including waste water treatment plant) and retention of frith end quarry haul road for access to the site and hotel

SHCC/2014/0138 Sandy Bridge Farm, Main Road, Kingsley, GU35 9NQ Variation of condition 1 of planning permission F24847/015/CMA to extend the time period for tipping of inert waste and to revise the final restoration contours

21066/029 Bakers Farm Nursery, Main Road, Kingsley, Bordon, GU35 9NJ
Change of use for storage and distribution B8

21066/030 Bakers Farm Nursery, Main Road, Kingsley, Bordon, GU35 9NJ
Siting of temporary buildings (corrected proposal)

28421/004 Crossing Gate Cottage, Sickles Lane, Kingsley, Bordon, Alton, GU35 9PB
Single storey side extension forming double garage and bedroom with wet room within roof space

Appeal:
APP/M1710/A/14/2214126 Appeal by: Mr Dragjoshi
Land south and east of Service Station, Farnham Road, Bordon

APP/M1710/A/14/2222602 Appeal by: LMC of Farnham Ltd
LMC Sleaford Garage, Farnham Road, Bordon, GU35 0QP

8. St Nicholas Cemetery & Cemetery Chapel
To receive an update from Cllr Pearson
To consider the invoice from Richard Ashby for the specifications and tender documents for works to be carried out in St Nicholas

9. Transport, Highways and Road Safety
The lengthsman scheme:
To receive an update from Cllr Rigden

10. Commons, Village Greens and Rights of Way
Upper Green: To receive an update from Cllr Rigden
Lower Green: To receive an update from Cllr McCorkindale

To consider the quotation of £195 for cutting the area of Lower Green covered by golden rod
To consider the quotation of £245 for cutting the area between the track and the stream on the eastern side of Lower Green.

11. Community Resilience
12. Environment and Biodiversity
13. Kingsley Village Forum   

Kingsley Annual Parish Meeting:
To receive an update from Cllr Rigden and to consider the actions the Parish Council should take as result of this meeting

14. Housing, Business & Commerce
Hampshire Alliance for Rural Affordable Housing:
To receive an update from Cllr McCorkindale

15. Communications
16. District Councillor
17. Procedures, Finance and Payments
Payments to be made & Accounts to accept
Approval of annual return year ending March 2014
To consider the annual donation of £500 to the Kingsley Centre (Last year the donation was £475 plus £100 for the new notice board)
To consider the biennial increase in the annual rent from £325 to £350 paid for the lease of the allotment site
Enhancing the recruitment of parish councillors

    Date of Next Meeting of Kingsley Parish Council -
       Thursday 27th November 2014 - 7.30 pm at the Kingsley Centre 
      

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

District Councillors wanted

Become a councillor and Change Your World

East Hampshire District Council is calling for new councillors with the desire to change their world and the business sense to make it happen.

With an election looming next May, EHDC is looking to attract councillors with the ambition to take on the council’s vision and the skills to make it reality.

The campaign to recruit new councillors begins with two drop-in meetings on October 24 and 27 at the council offices in Petersfield, where prospective candidates can find out what it takes to be a councillor.

Sandy Hopkins, EHDC Chief Executive, said: “We are looking for people with a broad range of abilities and community interests, people who are looking for a chance to use their skills for the benefit of the community; people who want to put something back.

“With the unprecedented pressures on public sector funding councils must be ever more business-like and professional if they are to thrive.

“EHDC is setting out a unique way forward for local government, a new way of running a council with the focus on innovation and income generation. We have ambitious plans and we need councillors with the business skills to see it through. We need a new kind of councillor for a new kind of council.”

Residents with the energy and passion to make a difference in their area should come to the council on Friday 24 October, 2-5pm, Monday 27 October, 6.30-9.30pm or Tuesday 18 November, 6-9pm, and find out how they can make a difference in their community and change their world.

For more information go to www.easthants.gov.uk/changeyourworld

Communications Officer: Will Parsons, EHDC Communications Officer, 01730 234030

Friday, 26 September 2014

October Crimestoppers

Police are warning motorists to be careful when selling cars following the thefts of several vehicles over the past few months. I wrote about this a while ago when we had a similar spate, so please forgive me for this reminder! Perhaps the end of the summer prompts us to want a change of vehicle; it is easier than cleaning it out sometimes!

Vehicles being offered for sale in a newspaper or magazine, and certainly the internet, can attract people from far and wide to view the car. However, some come with the intention of taking the car without paying.

In one incident, whilst the would-be buyer was being shown around the car, he jumped into the driver’s seat, locked the doors and sped off. In another, during a test drive, the owner and would-be buyer got out at a petrol station to inspect the engine under brighter lights when the thief again jumped in and drove away, and in a third incident, after the test drive and the owner was making a cup of coffee for the man who said he would buy the car, he claimed he had left his phone in the vehicle during the test drive. He then took the owner’s keys supposedly to recover his phone, but drove off with her car. Bear in mind that an insurance company will be reluctant to pay out if a car is stolen in this way.

When selling your vehicle, never let the potential purchaser have the keys unless you are also in the vehicle. If you drive first on a test drive, take the keys out of the ignition until everyone is back in the car and then pass them over.

If you are buying a car privately, if you possibly can, try to avoid meeting anyone in a car park or service station.  It is a potentially safer purchase to see the owner at their home, where the address on the registration document should match up, and the service history is likely to be from a local garage. You also know where the seller is if there is a problem.

Remember, don’t release your vehicle until you have the cleared funds safely in your bank. A cheque should be cleared first, and make sure that a bankers’ draft is genuine – a draft may be guaranteed funds, but not if the draft turns out to be fraudulent or stolen!

Remember to always keep your keys safe. Even a basic car is virtually impossible to steal without the keys to disarm the alarm and immobiliser, so never leave your keys lying around where they could be taken – for example on a bar or table when in a pub, or on your desk at work.

If you’ve information about any crime, please call Crimestoppers on 0800 555111, or log on to www.crimestoppers-uk.org  Your call is free, no one will know you called and you may earn a cash reward. You can also follow me on twitter for regular updates @HantsCrimestopp

Tuesday, 23 September 2014

Kingsley Parish Council - Sept 2014

Kingsley Parish Council will meet in the Kingsley Centre on Thursday, 25th September 2014 at 7.30pm

AGENDA

1.Chairman’s Opening Remarks
2.Apologies for Absence
3.Declarations of Personal/Prejudicial Interest
4.Public Question Time: Public Questions
Consideration of agenda items which will be open to public participation
5.Approval of Minutes of the Meeting held on 24th July 2014
6.Matters Arising
Encroachment and bins on Sandy Lane
To receive an update from Cllr McCorkindale

7.Planning Applications
Applications ongoing:
30633/024 Grooms Farm, Frith End Road, Frith End, Bordon, GU35 0QR
Ancillary building for events associated with existing hotel, together with landscaping, parking
works (including waste water treatment plant) and retention of frith end quarry haul road for
access to the site and hotel
SHCC/2014/0138 Sandy Bridge Farm, Main Road, Kingsley, GU35 9NQ Variation of condition
1 of planning permission F24847/015/CMA to extend the time period for tipping of inert waste
and to revise the final restoration contours
54919 Land at Kingsley Golf Club, Forge Road, Sleaford, Bordon
Retention of access from Kingsley Golf course onto the B3004, erection of gate and close board
fencing
24847/031 Sandy Bridge Farm, Main Road, Kingsley, GU35 9NQ
Variation of condition 1 of planning permission F24847/015/CMA to extend the time period for
tipping of inert waste and to revise the final restoration contours

Appeal:APP/M1710/A/14/2214126 Appeal by: Mr Dragjoshi
Land south and east of Service Station, Farnham Road, Bordon

APP/M1710/A/14/2222602 Appeal by: LMC of Farnham Ltd
LMC Sleaford Garage, Farnham Road, Bordon, GU35 0QP

New applications:
21066/029
Bakers Farm Nursery, Main Road, Kingsley, Bordon, GU35 9NJ
Change of use for storage and distribution B8
21066/030 Bakers Farm Nursery, Main Road, Kingsley, Bordon, GU35 9NJ
Siting of temporary buildings (corrected proposal)
28421/004 Crossing Gate Cottage, Sickles Lane, Kingsley, Bordon, Alton, GU35 9PB
Single storey side extension forming double garage and bedroom with wet room within roof
space
8.St Nicholas Cemetery & Cemetery Chapel
To receive an update from Cllr Pearson
9.Transport, Highways and Road Safety
The lengthsman scheme:
To receive an update from Cllr Rigden
10.Commons, Village Greens and Rights of Way
Upper Green:
To receive an update from Cllr Rigden
11.Community Resilience
12.Environment and Biodiversity
13.Kingsley Village Forum

Kingsley Annual Parish Meeting:
To receive an update from Cllr Rigden
To consider arrangements and funding £100 towards the cost of refreshments for the meeting
14.Housing, Business & Commerce
Hampshire Alliance for Rural Affordable Housing:
To receive an update from Cllr McCorkindale
15.Communications
16.District Councillor
17.Procedures, Finance and Payments
Payments to be made & Accounts to accept
To consider approval of the risk assessment updated June 2014
To consider the renewal of the Clerk's contract and to increase the weekly expenses to £10
Date of Next Meeting of Kingsley Parish Council - Thursday 23rd October 2014 - 7.30 pm at the Kingsley Centre

Tuesday, 16 September 2014

Crime in Kingsley

Crime in Kingsley was generally rare and, for the most part, confined to the odd fight or assault caused by visiting soldiers from Bordon camp having topped up on fine ales from the Cricketers. It was normal, in those days, for the troops to walk over Fir Hill from the camp to the pub which was not a very long walk. For a period of time there were large numbers of what were known as Junior Leaders. These were aspiring leaders but were quite young and often got drunk and fought, usually amongst themselves, but occasionally with other customers. In those days they would almost certainly end up nicked! No fines, Police cautions, or Restorative Justice then, simply in front of the Beak and weighed off. Military Police would occasionally patrol the local pubs at turning out time especially if there had been a few incidents recently. They didn’t mess about either, any offender was promptly loaded into their army vehicle and taken away.

As far as the civilian population was concerned it was usually gypsies that were responsible for trouble. It was common then for gypsies to travel around the countryside engaging in the seasonal work that the farms provided. As has been previously mentioned, most work was done by man power, the complex farm machinery of today was yet to be invented. The fields were, therefore, full of toiling bodies. Both men and women joined in the various tasks involved. The gypsies would camp up somewhere in the area, sometimes on ground provided by an individual farmer but often anywhere there was room for their caravans and livestock. Many carried chickens with them,(in specially provided boxes below the floor of the caravans), they almost always had an assortment of dogs and, of course, the horses which pulled the caravans. At the end of the day’s work it was the norm for the menfolk to make their way to the pub. Drink and gypsies always seemed to be a pretty lethal mix and trouble was often the end result. For the most part they confined their fighting to themselves. The extent of this sort of behaviour can be gauged by the fact that many pubs in both town and village displayed large signs telling the world, no travellers or gypsies would either be served or admitted.
Away from the pubs crime was very rare, the good people of Kingsley led blameless lives. The village had its policeman who lived amongst the community. In Kingsley’s case the police house was at the east end of the row of houses that began with Church View, I think, at the west end which was situated on the right hand side as you entered Woodfield. The policeman knew everyone on his patch and what was going on throughout the area. He spent his days in and around the village and was seen, I have no doubt that this contributed to the general good order of the day.

Houses, our own included, were left unlocked, it was unthinkable that anyone would walk in and rob the occupants whilst the property was empty. People didn’t travel as they do now and many of the villagers spent their whole lives in the village thus everybody knew and, I suppose, trusted one another. Strangers would stand out like a sore thumb so, again, I suppose the opportunity to get away with a criminal act would have been unlikely.

During the whole of the time I lived in the village I only recall two incidents involving village people that reached the courts and were one off’s. There may have been others but if there were they passed me by. The first was a straightforward theft which involved a woman. The lady involved was the mother of one of my friends and took the opportunity to relieve Woolworths, in Alton, of some small item. I seem to recall it was a card of buttons. In any event she was caught and found herself in front of the court. I do not intend to reveal the identity of the lady as there might well be relations still residing in the village. I do not recall the sentence which was handed down but I do clearly recall the overwhelming sense of disbelief and indeed shock that my parents and many of our neighbours felt and expressed. Quite simply, in those days, village people just didn’t do that sort of thing.

The other incident which caused a similar amount of shock in the community involved a mate of mine. Although several years older than me, we had spent a lot of time together due, in no small part, to the fact that he kept cage birds and often took me with him when he went to Aldershot market on a Saturday to buy new stock. We went up on the train from the Halt down near the Straits. However, as a teenager, the chap in question got himself a girlfriend, and no doubt, finding the delights of a young lady a greater attraction than cage birds he found himself confronted with the somewhat less delightful prospect of becoming a father. Sadly this caused him to abandon the relationship. It should be remembered that those were the days when, if a girl, "got into trouble" the shame was quite terrible. The rich would have sent their daughter off abroad to avoid scandal. The less well-off had to endure the social stigma that went with the situation as they had nowhere to hide. It is difficult to believe how much times have changed, today young women purposely have a child for the benefits that go with single parenthood. Back then they were on their own and if mum and dad did not help they really were in trouble. Often these events caused family breakdowns and long term feuds that never healed. Happily, I don’t recall any other such events in Kingsley but the local and national newspapers bore witness to these circumstances in the wider community. I suppose the fact that far more of these type of situations did not occur was quite simply fear. The swinging sixties were to change all that!

Anyway back to the case in point, after some time the young man was brought to account for his indiscretion. He found himself the subject of a court hearing at which it was intended to decide the level of support he would have to provide for the young lady. He denied responsibility and contested the case. I don’t recall exactly how many hearings there were, but at the final one, the young fellow failed to appear. Incredibly, it was reported, that police cars were driving around Alton calling his name over the loud hailer and summoning him to attend the proceedings. The details of what followed I cannot recall but his fatherhood was established and, no doubt, payment obtained. Again the sense of outrage and disgust amongst the community was palpable and the sympathy totally with the young lady. These matters were all a matter of public record and anyone wishing to research village history in greater depth can, I am sure, find full details in the archives of the local newspapers. Suffice to say, "things ain't what they used to be".

In addition to the two single offences outlined above there was also a young man who got into trouble and appeared to embark upon a life of crime. He was several years younger than I but I knew him very well. Sadly, he got into trouble at a young age and continued to offend for as long as I knew him. The last time I encountered him was after I had joined the Prison Service and had been sent to H.M.P. Winchester for my initial training before going to the training school in Wakefield. One day I happened to hear my name being called from above and upon looking there smiling down was the chap in question. We exchanged a few words and that was that. In those days if a member of staff knew a prisoner it had to be reported. Usually this resulted in the individual, prisoner, being moved to another establishment. Since I was about to depart to Wakefield I believe that did not happen in this case. I have not seen him since. However, as far as I am aware, he was the only one of the youngsters that grew up in the village at that time that went on to visit the prison system.

Tuesday, 2 September 2014

September Crimestoppers

Barely a day goes by that we don’t get emails inviting us to buy some form of medication, or invest in a get rich quick scheme or to buy a miracle cure. I have been lucky enough to win foreign lotteries I’d never even entered (although I’m still waiting for the enormous cardboard cheque and a celebrity on my doorstep making the presentation) and am a Prince in a far flung previously before unheard of state where if only I send an initial admin fee of £200, I could inherit a Kingdom.

The most recent scam which has raised its ugly head once again is that claiming to be from a friend who is in distress overseas. They’ve been mugged, or had their bags stolen, or met with a medical emergency. Whatever the reason, the request is for you to send some money to help them out. The recent one asks for around £1200, so my friends may have been very disappointed anyway!

The email goes on to ask you to reply and you will be presented with details of a Western Union transfer account into which you can pay your hard earned cash. Of course, with this type of account, it is easy money and someone can walk into a Western Union office anywhere in the world and make the cash withdrawal that you have kindly just sent, and with no chance of ever getting your money back once the scam is discovered.

To show how brazen these crooks have become, I had one of these e-mails to my work Police email account. I replied to the person to say that they had been hacked. I then got another e-mail saying, ‘No, it really is me. I had to rush off to the Philippines unannounced’, despite clearly interacting with the Police.

One of the clues is that the email is rarely in particularly good English. The spelling may be good, but the grammar and the order of the words in the sentence may be awry. Of course, if your Grandma was born and bred in Hampshire and has never been further than Aldershot in her whole life, it is unlikely that she will start writing e-mails in a foreign accent. It is also unlikely that she’d feel the need to jet off to the Far East without mentioning it either!

At this time of year, there are many students who are embarking on a gap year and taking the opportunity to see some sights. It can be very difficult if you do have loved ones travelling the world and being sure that they are safe. Perhaps arrange a password that they can put into their email if they are asking for a withdrawal from the bank of mum and dad so you know it really is them making the request.

Do be very wary if you’re ever asked for cash, or to buy something, in an unsolicited e-mail. None of us likes to think of our family or friends in distress and in need of help, but perhaps try ringing or texting them before you part with any money.

If you’ve information about any crime, please call Crimestoppers on 0800 555111. Your call is free, no one will know you called and you may earn a cash reward. You can also give information anonymously online at www.crimestoppers-uk.org  If you are on Twitter, please follow me @hantscrimestopp

PC Simon Wright
Force Crimestoppers Co-ordinator


Saturday, 30 August 2014

Oakhanger Road closure

TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE – OAKHANGER ROAD, BORDON

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Hampshire County Council proposes to make an order to allow South East Water to execute a new mains connection.

ROAD TO BE CLOSED:  That part of Oakhanger Road between its junction with Hartley Lane and its junction with Oakhanger Road / Latchford Lane.

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE: (from north to south and vice-versa) Oakhanger Road (C70), Main Road / Forge Road, Farnham Road, Station Road, Oakhanger Road (B3002 and C176).

DURATION OF ORDER: From 25th August 2014 for a period of 3 months or until completion of the works whichever is sooner.  (Notwithstanding, it is expected that the closure will be required for no longer than 4 days.) 

Reasonable facilities will be provided to allow access to adjacent premises while the work is being carried out.

Further information at: www.hants.gov.uk/publicnotices. Telephone inquires to: Hampshire County Council, Roads and Transport 0845 603 5633


STUART JARVIS Director, Economy, Transport & Environment The Castle, Winchester, SO23 8UD

The Straits closure

TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE – THE STRAITS, KINGSLEY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Hampshire County Council intends to make an order to allow highway maintenance works to be executed.

ROAD TO BE CLOSED: that part of The Straits, Kingsley between its junction with Sickles Lane and its junction Binsted Road.

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE: Binsted Road, The Street, Wheatley Lane.

DURATION OF ORDER: From 5th September 2014 for a period of 1 year or until completion of the works whichever is sooner.  (Notwithstanding, it is expected that the closure will be required for no longer than 3 days between 8.30 am and 4.30 pm.) 

Reasonable facilities will be provided to allow access to adjacent premises while the work is being carried out.

Further information at: www.hants.gov.uk/publicnotices. Telephone inquires to: Hampshire County Council, Roads and Transport 0845 603 5633


STUART JARVIS Director, Economy, Transport & Environment The Castle, Winchester, SO23 8UD

Monday, 18 August 2014

Fly fishing with Highie Withers

Hugh or Hughie as we called him was one of the Withers boys and he lived with the family in number 6 Goldhill. Hughie would have been, probably, a couple of years or so older than me. Of course he was a village boy the same as the rest of us and as with most of the village boys at that time, he was keen on fishing. The village pond was, at that time, available to fish without restriction or Army interference. I suppose the War Department, as it was then, had other things upon their minds. In any event the pond was fished extensively. Local boys spent long periods there and people came from around the area. By and large it was boys who fished there but occasionally an adult would come to fish. Indeed, I remember meeting a Mr. Wilmot from Petersfield one day. He was not only a keen angler but also a sergeant in the Hampshire Police at Petersfield. So, the pond was a popular fishing spot for many of us, as was the river beyond the common towards the Camp. The river provided some very good trout fishing in those days and like most rivers was kept clean and dredged by the River Authority of the day. Readers will no doubt recall last year's flooding and the many calls for dredging to resume in the rivers of Somerset. Why dredging in general was stopped I have no idea, I suspect it probably has something to do with money and profit. As with most of our services of yesteryear the great god money has taken over and actual service counts for very little as long as a few quid can be made.

But, the river was dredged and tracked cranes would progress along its banks digging out silt and vegetation. This had the benefit of keeping it reasonably weed free and free flowing, although, it is true to say that I well remember some years when it overflowed into the surrounding meadows.

So, in the times of which I write the river supported a large number of fish and at the top of the table were the wild brown trout other species included minnows, sticklebacks, loach, bullheads and the fresh water lamprey.

What has all this to do with Hughie Withers, well it all has to do with the methods employed to catch the fish, or more exactly, the trout. For the most part, indeed, as far as I am aware exclusively, the methods used were linked to floats or ledger or occasionally live bating. These were, if you like, the choices of the average villager and were used to catch all species including the trout. Trout, are as most people will be aware, classed as game fish and attitudes towards them in the angling fraternity have always differed to those of coarse fish. It was never quite the thing to attempt to take trout on a worm or live bait, both perfectly efficient ways of catching the fish, as indeed was spinning for them. I am fairly sure that the practice of live baiting has long been outlawed and can no longer be used.

So, as with many branches of field sports, there was a clear divide between "them" and "us" and an element of inbuilt snobbery existed. On all of the chalk streams and better trout waters, the cost of fishing ensured that village people, boys in particular, could not have afforded to fish for trout. This was very much the prerogative of the wealthy and the methods they used reflected the superiority of the sport. The noble trout should be caught on a fly. The purists among the trout fishing community would also argue strongly that only the dry fly was sporting, the wet version not quite being cricket in you follow my drift.

Back to Hughie, Hughie decided that he was going to catch trout on a fly. This was by no means an easy option, not least because of the cost involved. The fishing in the river itself did not involve cost but most certainly the tackle used to do so did. Tackle for trout fishing, as with anything considered to be a bit exclusive, always goes to ensure and extra cost being placed upon the necessary equipment. The fly rod was then usually made of split cane, the lines are specialist as they have to be able transport a delicate fly and gently deposit upon the waters surface, flies were then hand made and cost more than your average bait. The art of presenting a fly is by no means an easy one and takes quite a bit of practice to get it right. Get it wrong and the chances of catching a trout are zero. There are, and always have been,those who make a handsome living from providing casting tuition but that would have been out of the question for a Kingsley school boy in those days. It still costs a huge amount of money today so things haven’t changed that much. It was, then, against such odds that Hughie took up fly fishing for trout. How he achieved it I know not, perhaps he got hold of a book or perhaps he did it by sheer trial and error, but achieve it he did. Not only did he catch a healthy number of good sized fish, he also mastered the art of tying his own flies. I never managed to go out with him on one of his fishing trips but I often saw him casting away from a distance. He was happy to talk about the fish he caught and how he had done so but he seemed to prefer to do so in his own company. This, for me, created a certain mystery and I had immense admiration for his skill in achieving such an unlikely ability and, as far as I am aware by his own endeavours. I hope, in the course of his life, he one day got the chance to use his skills on one of the great trout waters, he deserved to do so.
 

Thursday, 7 August 2014

Jalsa Salana 40MPH

TEMPORARY 40 MPH SPEED RESTRICTION – B3004 Worldham Hill / Green Street, East Worldham and B3004 Forge Road, Kingsley

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Hampshire County Council is making an order for safety reasons in connection with the Jalsa Salana event, as follows:

ROAD TO BE RESTRICTED: that part of B3004 between a point 70 metres east of its junction with Pookles Lane and a point 643 metres south-west of its junction with the access road to Dean Farm Golf Club, an approximate distance of 2,400 metres.

DURATION OF ORDER: from 18th August 2013 for a period of 1 month. (Notwithstanding, it is expected that the speed restriction will be required for no longer than the period of the event during which time it  will be in force 24 hrs per day.) 

Details may be viewed at: www.hants.gov.uk/publicnotices.  If you have any queries regarding the above please contact Hampshire County Council, Highways Department on 0845 603 5633

STUART JARVIS Director of Economy, Transport & the Environment, The Castle, Winchester, SO23 8UD

Wednesday, 6 August 2014

Council Meetings - digital recording/broadcasting

New law now allows press and public to film, tweet and blog council meetings.

In a boost for local democracy and the independent free press, councils in England were brought into the 21st century today (6 August 2014) after Local Government Secretary, Eric Pickles, signed a Parliamentary order allowing press and public to film and digitally report from all public meetings of local government bodies. This ‘right to report’ updates a law passed by Margaret Thatcher as a backbench MP.

This new law builds on Margaret Thatcher’s successful Private Members’ Bill from 1960 which allowed for the written reporting of council meetings by the press. The new rules will apply to all public meetings, including town and parish councils and fire and rescue authorities.

The Plain English guide to the new rules is here.

Tuesday, 5 August 2014

Crimestoppers August

I hope you have been enjoying the long hot summer, which is supposed to continue for some while yet to come. Now I’ve said that out loud, you can guarantee we’ll be reaching for the wellies in days!

During periods of warm weather it is tempting to leave doors and windows open but please remember that insecure properties are an invitation for intruders. Most burglars are opportunists who do not plan their crimes but constantly look for an easy chance to enter a property – either your home, or your office - through a door or window that has been left open.

In a recent incident, a youth walked into the home of an elderly lady through the open front door while she was outside in her garden. The man stole the victim’s purse before calmly walking back out of the house.  As he was leaving, he was seen by the pensioner and said that he was in her home because he wanted a glass of water!

A burglar doesn’t really want to go to the effort of forcing doors and windows and rarely needs to.  When going out, securely lock all doors and windows – no matter what the temperature and no matter how long you intend to be away. 'Just popping across the road for a minute' is ample time for a criminal to strike. If you are working or relaxing in the back garden make sure that the windows and doors which you cannot see are securely closed. 

Remember - do be a nosey neighbour! Tell the Police or Crimestoppers if you see anyone acting suspiciously in your neighbourhood, and if possible, take the registration numbers of any unusual vehicles in the area.

Unfortunately the warm weather also leads to an increase in anti-social behaviour, albeit sometimes unintentional. Please remember how far your voices/music etc will carry on a long hot summer evening. Your neighbours at the other end of the street might not appreciate your choice of barbecue music! That said, please also try to be tolerant. Your neighbour’s party may be irritating (especially if you weren’t invited!) but if it is only once a year, just bear in mind that it will soon be over.

Remember, Hampshire really is a great place to live and work so please don’t have nightmares (I think someone once said!). However we can all do our bit to make our communities an even better place to be. Please call Crimestoppers on 0800 555111 if you have information about ANY crime. Your call is free and no one will know you called. Alternatively, you can give information anonymously on line at www.crimestoppers-uk.org where you can also see images of people the Police would like a word with. You will also find me on Twitter at @HantsCrimestopp

PC Simon WRIGHT
Force Crimestoppers Co-ordinator

Wednesday, 23 July 2014

Tuesday, 22 July 2014

GUNS

Of course the world has changed dramatically since my childhood days in Kingsley. Many of the things we did as children have been banned by useless politicians who resort to banning as the first port of call when anything goes wrong. Experience tells the world at large that the banning policy never actually works. In the case of guns, it is now, not possible to legally own a pistol in the U.K. if you are an ordinary citizen. Problem solved, well not quite, as there is now more gun crime involving pistols than there ever was before the ban was imposed. The only people inconvenienced have been lawful gun owners whom held licensed weapons. Criminals don’t apply for licenses or ` obey the law, sadly politicians don’t seem to understand this simple truth. I have never had, nor do I want to own a pistol. Just in case anyone thought I was banging the drum as a disgruntled ex-pistol club member or something similar. The point being that the only people inconvenienced by the banning culture are ordinary decent and law abiding citizens, banning makes not a jot of difference to the criminal fraternity.

So, as far as I, and many of my childhood friends were concerned, we began our association with guns at an early age. In those days western films featuring cowboys and Indians were all the rage and consequently most little boys had toy guns and holsters just like their cowboy heroes. These, quite fancy, pistols fired caps which made a crack rather than a bang. They did not discharge any sort of missile. The first gun I had that actually shot something from its barrel was a very basic pistol. Known in those days as a pop gun, it had some sort of plunger. A cork was pushed into the end of the guns barrel and when the trigger was pulled the plunger was released and the cork fired by the compressed air which had been released into the barrel. The cork left the gun with a loud pop, hence the name of the gun. All very harmless but it was the beginning of the process of teaching us the correct way to handle guns. Even with such a harmless toy, the principles of gun handling were rammed home to me by my parents. In short, you never, ever point a gun at a person. This simple rule was drummed into me and, I am sure, my mates. There were no half measures, break this rule and the wrath of God would have descended upon you. So it was that those of us that had guns learned to handle them safely and with respect, I do not recall a single accident or injury involving a gun in Kingsley during the whole of the time I lived there.

From pop guns most of us acquired an air gun. These came, in those days, in two forms, pistols and rifles. The operating principles were much the same in that the barrel was broken and pulled back to compress air in a cylinder which was released after the barrel had been closed and the trigger pulled. Thus a lead pellet was fired. Depending upon the size and power of the individual weapon a pellet could be fired quite a long way and with enough force to kill rats, birds, squirrels and rabbits etc. As children (and with a resident village Policeman) we were able to wander around with our air rifles unhindered. Just imagine the almighty fuss if a child did that today. I am sorry to say, for the most part, we used our rifles to shoot living things and whilst rat shooting was seen as a bit of a service by farmers I regret having shot some of the non-offensive birds which fell victim to us. Although crows, magpies and other egg stealing species were considered fair game.

Later in life as I became a teenager I acquired my first shotgun and was then able to shoot some rather more edible game in the form of rabbits and pigeons with, very occasionally, a stray pheasant. I still have the first twelve bore I owned. This was given to me by my grandfather Charley Gilliam. It is an old hammer gun of extremely dubious condition. The old barrels are worn very thin and there is much slack when the weapon is closed. Beneath the under lever is a washer which grandfather had fixed there in order to take up the slack.There are also other modifications, no doubt, designed to make good the general wear and tear of this old gun. I didn’t fire it many times as, realising that the gun had been made to fire black powder cartridges, I considered the modern nitro cartridges had a very good chance of bursting the barrels. None of this really mattered, the gun was, and is, a treasure for me. For many years it graced the wall above our fireplace in our old Dorset farmhouse, but of course, that is now banned and the gun remains securely locked away in a steel gun cabinet bolted down so as to be immoveable. It was even suggested by the Licensing Officer that I should destroy it!

I doubt very much if the boys of today’s Kingsley are able to wander the fields, woods and commons with any form of air rifle. Sadly, if they did, I expect within a very short time there would be a police armed response team, helicopters overhead and a major incident declared. Without a doubt those of my generation had the best of it, this free and pleasant land of ours is now subject to multitudes of freedom restricting rules and laws all courtesy of politicians whom consistently fail to deal with the real problems and causes of crime and violence. Have things got better or safer, if they have I will eat my hat. Enough said.

Monday, 21 July 2014

Parish Council Thursday 24th

Kingsley Parish Council meets on Thursday, 24th July 2014 in the Kingsley Centre at 7.30pm.

AGENDA

1. Chairman’s Opening Remarks
2. Apologies for Absence
3. Declarations of Personal/Prejudicial Interest
4. Public Question Time: Public Questions
Consideration of agenda items which will be open to public participation

5. Approval of Minutes of the Meeting held on 26th June 2014
Matters Arising
Encroachment and bins on Sandy Lane
To receive an update by Cllr McCorkindale

6. Planning Applications
Applications ongoing:
30633/024 Grooms Farm, Frith End Road, Frith End, Bordon, GU35 0QR
Ancillary building for events associated with existing hotel, together with landscaping, parking works (including waste water treatment plant) and retention of frith end quarry haul road for access to the site and hotel

SHCC/2014/0138 Sandy Bridge Farm, Main Road, Kingsley, GU35 9NQ Variation of condition 1 of planning permission F24847/015/CMA to extend the time period for tipping of inert waste and to revise the final restoration contours

54919 Land at Kingsley Golf Club, Forge Road, Sleaford, Bordon
Retention of access from Kingsley Golf course onto the B3004, erection of gate and close board fencing

Appeal:
APP/M1710/A/14/2214126 Appeal by: Mr Dragjoshi
Land south and east of Service Station, Farnham Road, Bordon

New applications:
24847/031 Sandy Bridge Farm, Main Road, Kingsley, GU35 9NQ
Variation of condition 1 of planning permission F24847/015/CMA to extend the time period for tipping of inert waste and to revise the final restoration contours

7. St Nicholas Cemetery & Cemetery Chapel
8. Transport, Highways and Road Safety
To agree the lengthsman scheme

9. Commons, Village Greens and Rights of Way
Upper Green: To receive an update from Cllr Rigden

10. Community Resilience
11. Environment and Biodiversity
12. Kingsley Village Forum   
13. Housing, Business & Commerce
Hampshire Alliance for Rural Affordable Housing
To consider housing survey for Kingsley

14. Communications
15. District Councillor
16. Procedures, Finance and Payments
Payments to be made & Accounts to accept

Date of Next Meeting of Kingsley Parish Council -
       Thursday 25th September 2014 - 7.30 pm at the Kingsley Centre 
      

Downsizing the Nevilles

• SALE • SALE • SALE • SALE • SALE •
DOWNSIZING SALE
FURNITURE
SOFAS - TABLES - CHAIRS
SUPER KING BED - MIRRORS - LAMPS
GLASS - CHINA
PAINTINGS - ORNAMENTS
KITCHEN UTENSILS
GARDEN POTS - TOOLS
LADDERS
Crossing Gate Cottage
Sickles Lane, Kingsley, GU35 9PB
Tel: 01420 488912 / 477894


Saturday 26th & Sunday 27th July
10am - 4pm daily
• SALE • SALE • SALE • SALE • SALE •

Saturday, 19 July 2014

Oakhanger road closure

Oakhanger Road from its junction with Hartley Lane to its junction with Oakhanger Road/Latchford Lane will be closed from 25th August 2014 for a period of three months to allow South East Water to lay new supply to new property.


Friday, 11 July 2014

Vicars

Readers who have been following my jottings will be aware the church played a significant part in village life during my childhood. The village school was a Church of England School, many children, probably most of us, belonged to the Sunday School and church choir at some time or other. Village events were quite often arranged by groups which included contingents from the Church. This is not to suggest that we were all deeply religious, certainly in my case and many of my friends, this was not the case at all. We attended the various church functions because they were available and, in the absence of anything else, that is what we did. It was also the case that if your friends went you did as well, so I suppose, peer pressure played a part in all of this. Anyway, as a result of the various church activities, I and many of the other village children came into contact on a regular basis with the vicars who served Kingsley.

For most of us that contact would have begun with the visits to the school made by the vicar, during the week, for prayers before lessons began. I don’t recall now how many days a week this occurred, I have a feeling it was probably twice, but it could have been more. It was also common practice then for the vicar of the day to visit parishioners who were sick either at home or in hospital. He, for in those days it was always a male, would also visit the bereaved. I have no idea if this still happens, but it did then.

There was a period during which the village had no appointed vicar and the parish was served by a series of stand-in vicars whom came out of retirement, from Bordon I think, to cover services etc. until a new permanent vicar was appointed. Not having kept a record of the dates, I now have no idea when this was and I am not sure which vicar it was that was eventually appointed. However, during this period there was one vicar that I remember well. He was a little balding man, he wore glasses and was obviously getting on a bit. The reason I remember him was due entirely to his particular style of preaching. He was from, what then, would have been known as the hellfire and brimstone school. His sermons were nothing, if not impressive, and ensured that those present in the congregation listened to what he said. No dozing in the pews when this man was in the pulpit. His sermons could reasonably be described as a bit of a rant but actually I found his presentations quite interesting and he succeeded, well as far as I was concerned, in making the listener think. In preaching terms I imagine that is the objective and therefore he could claim to have done his job well. I have long forgotten this good man’s name but I have often thought of him over the years. So, the period of visiting vicars came to an end and a new incumbent arrived, and here I have a problem, because I don’t recall which of the two village vicars that was. For the most part during my links with the church there were two vicars one was the Rev. Barras,(?)not sure of the spelling, and the other the Rev Jones. Guessing, I tend to think they served in that order but in any event parish records will guide anyone who wishes to establish this point. I will deal with the two of them in the order I have suggested and in the hope that it is the right way around, although, the interest in these two is concerned with the men not the dates when they served.

The Rev. Barras, a bachelor, arrived in Kingsley with his mother whom I think was a widow. She was a pleasant kindly lady and, as would be expected, a regular church attender. The pair took up residence in the vicarage which was opposite and just below the Cricketers. It quickly became clear that the Rev Barras was rather more High Church than his predecessor. I clearly remember the wagging tongues of condemnation amongst the adult community which I came into contact with. Many of whom, it must be said, seldom entered the church. Kingsley, like hundreds of similar rural villages of the time was rather conservative and not a little staid. Therefore the Reverend's form of conducting church business was not universally well received. Indeed, I heard it referred to as "bowing and scraping!. In real terms, it would have been noticed, that the new vicar tended to kiss things around him rather regularly and introduced the incense burner which he waved around during services causing a heavy perfumed smoke to waft all over the place. Previously and for as long back as could be remembered proceedings had been conducted along what was referred to as "Low Church", an all-together more sombre way of doing things and far less theatrical. There were even those that were heard to suggest that things had become rather Catholic and, some I could name, were not impressed. Be that all as it may, the vicar seemed to settle nicely into the village community and its way of life. I learned during my recent visit to the village exhibition in the old school, that he had been instigatory in raising money to provide for new school toilets. No doubt a very well received and welcome contribution at the time. I don’t recall how long Rev. Barras served as the Kingsley vicar but his downfall and departure were as dramatic as they were swift.

Reportedly, the Rev entered a toilet in Alton which had a certain reputation for "goings on". Inside he was said to have propositioned a man who turned out to be an undercover police officer engaged, in what would today, be known as a sting. Arrested and brought before the Courts, the Reverend was in disgrace. I seem to recall a custodial sentence and, of course he was defrocked. It should be remembered that until 1967 when the Sexual Offences Act was passed, all forms of homosexuality were against the law. Not having researched those murky waters in any great depth, I can only imagine that such behaviour in a public toilet would still be against the law. From the start of my life in Kingsley until I left in the late sixties I cannot recall another incident that caused such an overwhelming sense of shock and disgust in equal measure. The matter was to be heard on most peoples lips and there was also a general sense of sorrow and sympathy for the vicars mother, whom I believe, was very much liked and respected.

The Rev Jones followed, he was an older, married man. He and his wife quickly settled into village life and involved themselves in most aspects thereof. As I write this piece I am becoming more confident that I have reported these two vicars in the correct order. It occurs to me that I was confirmed during the Rev. Jones’ time and since, by then, I would have been a teenager the Rev Jones was probably the last vicar that I had any contact with. I also recall that I used to wash the vicars car each Friday evening. A large black Rover, which the vicar liked to be highly polished, I was paid half a crown for each wash. My father, for quite a long time, looked after the vicarage gardens and grounds. In those days there were quite large flower beds, large expanses of lawn and a good sized vegetable plot. I well remember father having an ongoing battle with the ground elder which was widespread in the gardens then. It was during the Jones’ time at the vicarage that the village fete was held within its grounds. The couple remained until the vicar retired and were very well regarded in the village. It is quite possible that during my time in Kingsley there were other vicars, if there were I don’t recall them. If they appeared as I moved through my teens, I would not have encountered them as my visits to church ended. Although, for most of my life since leaving Kingsley, I have lived in villages which had parish churches I have never felt the need to engage with them other than to attend weddings, funerals and christenings with the occasional harvest festival thrown in. Our daughters were both christened and confirmed and in turn our grandchildren have been christened. Both daughters were married in church but that was their choice and had nothing to do with any influence from me. Although I support village events and quite like the Church as a village institution, my days of church life in Kingsley did little or nothing to make me a great follower and religion holds no attraction for me. Perhaps, not least, because as a result of a career of over thirty years in the Prison Service, I encountered a high number of religious men, vicars, priests etc. from all sorts of denominations which were locked up. For the most part they were locked up for offences of a sexual nature which often involved children and young people. But, of course, that is another story for another day!

Tuesday, 1 July 2014

Scams Bulletin June 2014

The purpose of this scams bulletin is to enable Hampshire residents to be aware, and therefore guard against the type of scams currently being reported to the Hampshire Trading Standards Service.

Trading Standards will collate information on scams to provide information and intelligence to the public and other agencies but will normally only intervene when the victim is vulnerable and has been financially abused
.
In appropriate cases Trading Standards will also seek to take enforcement action through the courts.

If you are worried about a potential scam please contact: Citizens Advice Consumer Helpline on
03454 04 05 06 or online using the Online consumer complaint form

Bank Account Fraud

Hampshire Trading Standards Service has received recent enquiries about a sophisticated
bank account fraud. The fraud is very convincing, and Hampshire residents are urged to keep alert should they receive a telephone call from someone alleging they work for a fraud or security department connected to their bank. The caller will cause alarm by warning the customer that their
bank account has been compromised in some way and suspicious activity has occurred. They will ask their intended victim to phone their bank’s fraud department without delay.

However, unbeknown to the receiver of this call, the fraudster has kept the telephone line open. Therefore, when the victim phones what they believe to be an official number, they are re connected to the fraudster. The fraudster this time, posing as the bank, will then ask the customer to transfer their funds into a separate holding account. Once this is done, the call is terminated and the money is
lost.

Real life case study

Mr C received a call during the evening from someone who said they worked for
the ‘Visa Verification Department’ at his bank. He asked Mr C to confirm who his bank was. Mr C was told someone had attempted to access his account, and he was asked to phone the fraud department at his bank. Mr C found the telephone number on the internet so had no reason to doubt he was phoning the correct department. He was then asked to transfer his current account funds and savings into a holding account. Mr C transferred approximately £18,000. When the call was terminated, Mr C began to question the authenticity of this matter. He decided to phone the fraud department again. This time, he spoke with the correct office who advised him he had been scammed.

Trading Standards Officers visited Mr C and he agreed to change his telephone number. This is the only way Mr C can stop the fraudster from contacting him again. Mr C is pursuing his complaint through the Financial Ombudsman Service, in the hope he receives his money back.

Should you receive a similar telephone call DO NOT engage in conversation and hang up
as soon as possible. Check the validity of the call with your local bank branch, but DO NOT
make a phone call from your land line as this may reconnect you to the fraudster. Use a
mobile phone if you have one, or ask a neighbour/friend to check for you. Best of all, visit your bank branch in person.

Most banks have security systems in place to deal with fraudulent attempts on an account.
Normal practice is to place a block to prevent money from being taken. They will not ask a
customer to transfer funds over the phone in these circumstances.

If you are worried about scams please contact:
Citizens Advice Consumer Helpline on 03454 04 05 06 Or online using the Online consumer complaint form

Real life case study 2

Mrs E received a phone call from a male who alleged he worked for ‘Visa Payment Security’. He asked if she had lost her debit card, as £900 had just been taken by a well known shop. Mrs E found her card in her purse, and told the male she had not lost it. He advised her that she may be victim of a fraud, and to phone the number on the back of the card. Mrs E dialled this number
immediately. She was advised to transfer all her money, £25,000 in total, into one account. Mrs E did so using internet banking. She was then advised to transfer this amount into a separate holding account, and he gave her a sort code and account number. Mrs E was not prepared to do this, and said she would drive to her local branch for help. The caller said he suspected the fraud was being committed by someone in the branch, and he advised Mrs E to say she was transferring the money into a relative’s account. During the journey she began to doubt the validity of the call. On arriving at the bank, they advised her this was an attempt at a fraud. Thankfully, no money had been lost.

Copycat ‘Government’ Websites

Hampshire residents are warned to look out for numerous copycat websites that they may find
using a search engine or receive a link to in an email. Copycat websites charge a fee to process or renew documents, such as passports or visas, which can be done for free or much cheaper through the official organisation. Although it is not against the law for a private company to offer a similar  service, their website should carry a clear disclaimer explaining it is not affiliated with the official body in any way.

Current Copycat ‘Government’ Websites to look out for include:

  • Passport Renewal or Checking Service
  • EHIC Card
  • Congestion Tax
  • Car Tax
  • Driving License Renewal
  • Tax Refunds

There are a number of ways to spot a copycat website:

  • Read the homepage of the website carefully as it may even state it is not affiliated with the official body.
  • Don’t be mislead by a ‘.org’ address. This does not guarantee it is the official site.
  • Look out for ‘paid for’ search engine results. These are boxed adverts displayed at the top of search engine results pages. Quite often the official site is not the top result.
  • Check to see if the web address begins with ‘https’ as this acts as an encryption to
  • protect personal details.

Do not open any links contained in an email if you are not sure of its source.
DO NOT open an email or any attachments if you have any concerns about its source or content.

For further advice or to report a scam please contact the Citizens Advice Consumer Helpline on 03454 04 05 06 or online using the Online consumer complaint form

Real life case study

Mr B needed to renew his car tax, and carried out an internet search to find out how to do this. Mr B found what he presumed to be the official website and made a payment online. However, three weeks later, he had not received his tax disc. He contacted the DVLA who confirmed this was a scam.

Computer Telephone Scams

Hampshire County Council Trading Standards Service continues to receive enquiries from concerned consumers and businesses who receive a telephone call from someone claiming to be from their computer support service. Once the caller has got the consumers attention they may try to:

  • Sell and install software that may damage the computer
  • Request payment details to pay for non existent services
  • Take control of the computer remotely
  • Direct you to fraudulent websites that will ask you for personal and financial
  • information
Should you receive a similar unsolicited phone call, remember:

DO NOT purchase any software or services
NEVER give control of your computer to a third party
NEVER Provide your credit card or financial information
HANG UP as soon as possible

If you are worried about scams, please contact; Citizens Advice Consumer Helpline on 03454 04 05 06 Or online using the Online consumer complaint form

Real life case study

Mrs P received a call from a man who alleged to work for her computer software support centre. He said that her computer operating system was out of date and he could install an update. Mrs P was in the process of moving house, so she told the caller her computer was disconnected and had been packed up. The man terminated the call. This made Mrs P suspicious and on checking with Trading
Standards she was advised this was a scam.

Crimestoppers July

Did you know that the value of bikes stolen each year exceeds the value of property stolen from people in house burglaries? Bicycles are expensive nowadays and having one stolen is not only costly but also extremely inconvenient.  At this time of year, the ‘fair weather’ cyclists are also all out and about and so there is an even better selection of bikes for the would-be thieves to choose from.

Without a doubt, your chance of keeping possession of your valued bicycle is to buy a quality lock for it AND REMEMBER TO USE IT! It is advisable to position the lock to include as much of the frame and other parts as possible. With most locks, the frame and at least one wheel can be protected. Any accessories such as lights, pump, water-bottles should be removed wherever possible when your bike is parked otherwise the chances of still owning them when you return to collect your bike is serious reduced.

Many cycles are stolen when owners leave them against shop windows. They are only ‘nipping into the store for a few seconds’ and believe that they can ‘keep on eye’ on their bike so they don’t bother with a lock. Thieves know this too, and are happy to help themselves.

Youngsters are very good at dumping and temporarily abandoning their bikes because something has attracted their attention; their friends, a football game. No time to use a lock as every second counts when there are other things to think about, and valuable time will be lost when it comes to cycling away at a moment’s notice, not to mention looking ‘uncool’ by being seen to worry about security. Losing a school jumper will get you in trouble with your mum or dad, but losing your bike as someone has ridden off on it whilst you were hanging around with your mates is a far more costly practise!

Other vulnerable bikes are those that are left on roof or boot racks on vehicles. These are very popular nowadays and when these vehicles are left unattended in car parks, or when waiting for ferries, they can be targeted by thieves for a very quick and easy steal.

Please have your bike security marked, or get your postcode stamped on the frame. Hundreds of bikes are recovered by the Police each year but many are never traced back to their rightful owners. Make a note of your bike’s details and vital statistics, so that should the worst happen, you may get to see your bike again.

If you have information about ANY crime, please do not hesitate to give Crimestoppers a call on 0800 555 111, or you can click www.crimestoppers-uk.org and tell us what you know online. Either way is entirely anonymous and no one except you (unless you tell people yourself!) will know that you gave information.

For regular updates, please follow me on twitter @HantsCrimestopp

PC 741 Simon Wright

Tuesday, 24 June 2014

Kinsgley Parish Council - Thursday 26th June

Kingsley Parish Council meets on Thursday, 26th June 2014 in the Kingsley Centre at 8.00pm.

AGENDA

1. Chairman’s Opening Remarks
2. Apologies for Absence
3. Declarations of Personal/Prejudicial Interest
4. Public Question Time:Public Questions
Consideration of agenda items which will be open to public participation

5. Approval of Minutes of the Meeting held on 24th April 2014:Matters Arising
Encroachment and bins on Sandy Lane
To receive an update by Cllr McCorkindale

6. Planning Applications
Applications ongoing:

30633/024 Grooms Farm, Frith End Road, Frith End, Bordon, GU35 0QR
Ancillary building for events associated with existing hotel, together with landscaping, parking
works (including waste water treatment plant) and retention of frith end quarry haul road for
access to the site and hotel

22959/005 Unit 4, Kingsley Business Park, Main Road, Kingsley, Bordon, GU35 9LY
Change of use from B1 and B8 to B2 use (general industry)

20136/047 LMC Sleaford Garage, Farnham Road, Bordon, GU35 0QP
Extension to part rear, part side workshop and parts storage building; enabling removal of
existing ad hoc detached storage buildings and containers (revised application including Flood
Risk Assessment and Highway information further to 20136/045)

52947/002 Land to the East of Kingsley Sports Club, Sickles Lane, Kingsley, Alton
Installation of 5mw photovoltaic (solar) farm with associated equipment

55450 Area 1 and 2 Kingsley Quarry, Main Road, Kingsley, Bordon
Variation of condition 3 (working scheme) of planning permission F24847/014 (Plans available
to view on the HCC website)

24601/042 Country Market Osborne Farms, Main Road, Kingsley, Bordon, GU35 9LW
Roof mounted PV solar array

24601/042 Country Market Osborne Farms, Main Road, Kingsley, Bordon, GU35 9LW
Roof mounted PV solar array

SHCC/2014/0138 Sandy Bridge Farm, Main Road, Kingsley, GU35 9NQ Variation of condition
1 of planning permission F24847/015/CMA to extend the time period for tipping of inert waste
and to revise the final restoration contours

Farnborough Airspace plans
Appeal:
APP/M1710/A/14/2214126 Appeal by: Mr Dragjoshi
Land south and east of Service Station, Farnham Road, Bordon

New applications:
55585/001 Fenris 1 Sickles Lane, Kingsley, GU35 9PD
Demolition of existing bungalow and erection of replacement two story dwelling

54919 Land at Kingsley Golf Club, Forge Road, Sleaford, Bordon
Retention of access from Kingsley Golf course onto the B3004, erection of gate and close board
fencing

7. St Nicholas Cemetery & Cemetery Chapel
To consider instructing Richard Ashby to survey St Nicholas to produce specifications for remedial
work for water ingress and death watch beetle damage and any other things that need doing, at a total
cost of £2,250 and to use these specifications to obtain quotations for the required remedial works

8. Transport, Highways and Road Safety
Road Safety:
To receive an update from Cllr Rigden
Consider the lengthsman scheme

9. Commons, Village Greens and Rights of Way
Upper Green:
To receive an update from Cllr Rigden

10. Community Resilience
11. Environment and Biodiversity
12. Sports, Recreation and Leisure
Allotments:
To consider the provision of extra rabbit proof fencing for the allotment site at a cost of £300

13. Kingsley Village Forum
14. Parish Plan
15. Housing, Business & Commerce
Hampshire Alliance for Rural Affordable Housing
To consider whether to request housing needs survey for Kingsley
Parish representative on Whitehill and Bordon regeneration consultative tier
To receive an update from Cllr Rigden

16. Communications
17. District Councillor
18. Procedures, Finance and Payments
Payments to be made & Accounts to accept
Date of Next Meeting of Kingsley Parish Council -
Thursday 24th July 2013 - 7.30 pm at the Kingsley Centre